Mourners farewell Dungog flood victim Final farewell for Dungog Digger Brian Wilson at the Christ Church Anglican Church. Picture: Simone De Peak
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Final farewell for Dungog Digger Brian Wilson at the Christ Church Anglican Church. Picture: Simone De Peak

Final farewell for Dungog Digger Brian Wilson at the Christ Church Anglican Church. Picture: Simone De Peak

Final farewell for Dungog Digger Brian Wilson at the Christ Church Anglican Church. Picture: Simone De Peak

Final farewell for Dungog Digger Brian Wilson at the Christ Church Anglican Church. Picture: Simone De Peak

Final farewell for Dungog Digger Brian Wilson at the Christ Church Anglican Church. Picture: Simone De Peak

Final farewell for Dungog Digger Brian Wilson at the Christ Church Anglican Church. Picture: Simone De Peak

Final farewell for Dungog Digger Brian Wilson at the Christ Church Anglican Church. Picture: Simone De Peak

TweetFacebook●Three dead, four houses washed away in Dungog

● Dungog flood victims were veterans: RSL

A FULL house of about 200 mourners paid their last respects on Thursday to Brian Alexander Wilson, 72, one of three people to lose their lives in last week’s Dungog floods.

The service at Christ Church Anglican Church, Dungog, was conducted by Reverend Colvin Ford, with contributions by NSW Disaster Recovery Network chaplain Susan Phelan and Dungog RSL sub branch vice-president Jim Olsen.

In a poignant gesture late in the ceremony, more than 20 retired and active service personnel left their pews to put paper poppies on Mr Wilson’s coffin, symbolising the 339 days the Vietnam veteran spent in the army in 1968 and 1969.

Reverend Ford said Mr Wilson, a retired boilermaker who fixed and sold lawnmowers from a shed at the back of his Brown Street unit, was well-known in the town.

He said one of Mr Wilson’s children, Tamara Carsley, had become ‘‘the face of Dungog’’ after the storm.

He paid tribute to her for recovering her father’s medals and marching with them on Saturday at Anzac Day.

RSL sub-branches from across the Hunter Region sent representatives to the funeral, which included a reading from Psalm 23.

In this instance, ‘‘the valley of the shadow of death’’ was an appropriate description of the dip of land between Dowling Street and Lord Street, Dungog, that filled with water that Monday night and Tuesday morning, taking three lives in the process.

Reverend Ford said Dungog had ‘‘been through a lot these past few weeks’’.

‘‘As a town we’ve responded, too, and it’s been a wonderful thing to see,’’ Reverend Ford said. ‘‘We’re just small enough to be concerned for people, and big enough to pull together resources, and it’s great, it really is.’’

Mr Olsen said Mr Wilson rarely spoke of his time in the 1st Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment, and even some of his own family may not have heard the details.

He said Mr Wilson had been a corporal in ‘‘that dreadful war in Vietnam’’, and it was ‘‘a terribly dangerous rank, because it was one of those that really did the fighting’’.

‘‘On this day, we know one thing, that Brian Wilson has left us, once and for all, answering a roll call we all must face,’’ Mr Olsen said.

The service ended with a guard of honour, followed by a burial at Dungog cemetery.

A funeral service for Mr Wilson’s neighbour, Colin John Webb, 79, is at Dungog Uniting Church on Friday at 11am. A memorial service for Robin Reid MacDonald, 68, will be held at Dungog Memorial RSL Club on Monday at 11am.

A FULL house of about 200 mourners paid their last respects onThursday morning to Brian Alexander Wilson who died on Tuesday lastweek in the floods at Dungog.

TheService at Christ Church Anglican Church, Dungog, was conducted byReverend Colvin Ford, with contributions by NSW Disaster RecoveryNetwork chaplain Susan Phelan and Dungog RSL sub branch vice presidentJim Olsen.

Service at Christ Church Anglican Church, Dungog for Brian Wilson. Picture: Simone De Peak

Toward the end of the ceremony more than 20 retired and active servicepersonnel rose from their pews to put paper poppies on Mr Wilson’scoffin, symbolising the 339 days the Vietnam veteran spent in the armyin 1968 and 1969.

Reverend Ford said Mr Wilson’s daughter Tamara Carsley, had become”the face of Dungog” after the storm.

He paid tribute to her for recovering her father’s medals and marchingwith them on Saturday at Anzac Day.

The service ended with a guard of honour from the church steps,followed by a burial at Dungog cemetery.

Brian Wilson: Died in last week’s storms and floods that devastated the Hunter region. Picture: Supplied

A funeral service for Mr Wilson’s neighbour, Colin Webb, is in Dungog onFriday with the memorial service for the third victim, Robin Macdonald,on Monday.

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