James Nutt, 31, in front of his video for the Home to Home Digital Story exhibition. Picture: Darren Pateman James Nutt, 31, in front of his video for the Home to Home Digital Story exhibition. Picture: Darren Pateman
杭州桑拿

A PICTURE tells a thousand words. But James Nutt’s story about what it’s like to be a young person confined to a nursing home is as powerful as any image.

Mr Nutt spent seven years in an Upper Hunter nursing home after suffering horrendous injuries when he was bashed following a football grand final at Aberdeen in September 2003.

“In the nursing home, I got to the lowest part of my life, nothing was going right,” the 31-year-old said.

He is among a group of disabled young people who have shared their journeys as part of the Home to Home Digital Story exhibition at Newcastle Museum.

The exhibition gives a rare insight into a section of society that is normally hidden.

About 6000 people in their 20s and 30s are forced to live in aged care homes due to the high level of care they require. The 19 storytellers produced videos to capture their experience of living in a nursing home, being at risk of living in one or being a parent of a young person in a nursing home.

“This was my way of showing how my time in the nursing home was,” Mr Nutt said.

“I made friends with people only to have them pass away, over and over again. I had no rehabilitation and there was nothing there at all for me to do.”

Mr Nutt now lives in a specialised residential self-care complex at Mt Hutton with six other young people who have similar needs to him.

One of those residents is 36-year-old Arron Masters, who suffered brain damage following a motorcycle accident at Broadmeadow in 2005. He was confined to a Mayfield nursing home for four years after 14 months of rehabilitation.

“It’s not somewhere a young person should be,” Mr Masters said.

His life has taken a turn for the better since moving to Mt Hutton.

“I would like to do something more worthwhile. I need to find out what that is. I would like to contribute something valued,” he said.

The exhibition will remain at Newcastle Museum until May 10. It will then be displayed at Canberra and Geelong.

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